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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
, portland, toronto, chicago, tampa as some large cities that have sunday meter parking polices. the rationale for the sunday meter parking policy includes reduced frustration for all motorists. more successful neighborhood commercial district, which rely on parking available for customers. reduces congestion and all revenue returned to to mta. there is a question about how the meters operate if you have to run out there at noon to feed the meter and the answer is that the meters will accept pre-payment beginning at 4:00 a.m. and so you can make a pre-payment and then starting at noon, the payment that you make will take effect. and then there is the parking meter rates will be the sames on sunday. i included in your binders, there is -- i will put it on the overhead -- -- the sfmta is undertaking a public outreach program providing the form that i just put on the overhead. they are going to be printing tens of thousands of those. and have them available for local businesses to hand out to customers. there is also very similar design for 11x17 posters along with cash regist
of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator:
's dozen large cities literally overnight. why didn't the numerous positive changes in indianapolis over the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision of then mayor dick lugar. not the midwest has a way of producing bad and the amended decency. none of us fall in that category. sometimes that sense is questioned, but we do have individuals who have the ability to see to the heart of the matter and find a way to resolve a problem. such scale is extremely valuable in the united states senate. a body by its very design is supposed to foster compromise between legislators on issues before the nation. and so it was a natural progression that following his success as mayor, dick lugar's next job would be serving hoosiers is the united states senator. since 1977, senator lugar has represented hoosiers have served our nation admirably. without question, senator lugar is the type of lawmakers later who works hard to bring both parties together, find common ground and pass the legislation. those contributions are many, including this fine valley service on the senate agriculture committee
are in the local serving sector of the economy which has largely declined in recent years and what is your plan to create wage jobs in industries to prevent the city's work class from being displaced for the newer upper increase jobs and the high-tech jobs financial and provision service cities? >>> thank you supervisor and i'm glad to here and i join you in the effort of using social media to community with our constituent. >> let me start by saying that we have come off of the worst economic downturn when i took office last year the unemployment rate was 9.6%. that has now changed to eight% since 2011 and that is growing at a 6.6% pace, there are still more than 32,000 unemployed san franciscoians which i find unacceptable and we must do better i want to spill investor confidence and show businesses of all sites that we can start stay here. this year we are reformed from payroll tax and i heard that previous payroll tax hurt job growth and i agreed and propyl vision e was passed this last november and because of proposition e san francisco standards to ads more new private sector jobs a
, and eight miles northwest, but the row between virginia city and steamboat swings and a distance of seven miles. over the first daylong line of 9 beautiful columns the bottom constricted large house debate in. he likened the jets of steam needed for fissures in the ears with steamboats. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing them in a handkerchief and dipping them where they would soft boiled in two minutes or hardboiled in four depending on this move. sawyer of luxuriated in the hot mist, answered his column, the cards which were murky, and the baseboards were damp and the fresh bottles of dark beer were cold. in his 32 years slayer had been a porche boy. in the new york fire engine co. no. 14. and the first fire chief. sawyer served with the other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer flying the mexican sea trade. mark twain perked up when sawyer mentioned he was a steamboat engineer. the journalists, and danny boy who dreamed of shipping as a steamer or fireman, such a job he said knowingly has little drawbacks and the boiling steam
was just killed yesterday on biel and market. i'm shocked that this city would really think that this project, on fell street, and oak street, with such a large number of folks who are impacted, should be approved without some kind of an environmental review. i have worked in the environmental review area at various times -- >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is -- i live and work in that neighborhood, and i own a business at the corner of oak and divis. i'm also shocked there is no review at all of the impact on the streets and the delivery systems and all the things that are happening in that area. if you even try to block the streets with some cones and test it out for a minute to see what the real impact is, it will probably give us a better picture of what this feels and looks like. i've been delivering in that area for -- since -- at least 15, 18 years. and i drive through that street all the time, day in and day out. and i really feel like a real true study is very important to that area. i'm all for the safety of the bikers and i'm all f
data from u.s. cities compared to other cities in canada and other places, they're not radically different. what is most distinctive is that our violent crime is far more lethal and that is largely due to the fact that we have a rather porous system from trying to keep guns from dangerous system. >> connecticut has some of the strictest gun control laws in america get as you suggest it is very easy for weapons to move across this country, in my experience come whenever one of these mass shootings happens, it does not lead necessarily to tighter gun control. >> sadly, that is the case. typically, when such incidents occur, you have different agitations of those events. you have one set of individuals who say that we have to do something to strengthen our gun laws. then you have another group of individuals who say that we made it easier for teachers to have guns in public schools or what i consider to be rather fantasy come rather bad ideas. there are too many people who have this notion that the way we are going to solve this problem is to simply have more citizens armed and read
to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population growth and poor housekeeping, people are putting a lot of pollutants on the street and the streets are the openings to our stormwater sewer system. in an average year, 4,000 to 5,000 tons of trash ends up in long beach. man: we've created a system t
. >> was there a reason for that. it's typical in big cities, but communities that are rural, it's a little bit of a rarity. >> it's just the safety of our children is taken very seriously. it's a fairly large school between 500 and 600 students there. they want to keep control and know who is in the building with our children. >> i was talking to the state police and they said that they were processing the scene and children were still inside. how do you explain to their son whap about his classmate? >> we are a fairly religious family and we just talked about that they have gone to heaven. to be with jesus and that's about all we can say. we talk about you are not going to see them anymore and they are not going to be around. you really just struggle to find the words. >> you should know everyone is seng well wishes not just to you, but your community as a whole. so many people asked me to pass that along. >> we are a strong community. it is strong family community with a lot of love. we will get through it somehow, some way. >> let's go back to anderson. >> thank you very much. more now on s
? >> any particular reason for that? it's very typical in big cities, but communities pretty rural, a little bit of a rarity sometimes? >> i think they take the safety of our children very serious. it's a fairly large school. there's between 500 and 600 students there, and they want to keep control, and, you know who is in the building with our children. we'll be right back. >>> you heard monsignor wise talk about the hearts of newtown, the broken hearts, loving hearts and spoke in hopes of healing hearts tonight. here is more from the vigil today. ♪
laws here in new york city? do you think that this has curtailed violence in this city? >> well, i think that it has curtailed violence as much as possible. the problem that we have, of course is criminals go to virginia and other places, mostly virginia, buy large quantities of weapons and ship them illegally into new york so they get around the new york laws. which is why i introduced legislation a number of years ago to limit the number of weapons that a licensed gun dealer could sell to a person, to one a month, i think i said. but -- because no legitimate sportsman needs more than one every -- how many rifles can you have to shoot deer? >> well, today the white house website was flooded with new petitions. but before we get into the x's and o's and crossing the t's and dotting the i's of any kind of legislation, it really needs to be recognized as, for lack of a better term, a game changer, a moment in history where this changes public opinion. do you think we're there? >> i think we will be there if the president exploits it. and otherwise it will go to the next one. >> and d
. >> any reason for that? it is typical in big cities certainly, but in communities that are pretty rural, it's a little bit of a rarity sometimes. >> i think it is just, they take the safety of our children very serious. it's a fairly large school. there's between 500 and 600 students there. they want to keep control and know who's in the building with our children. >> i was talking to the state police and they said that they are processing the scene still which means there are still some children inside. how do you explain to your son what has happened about his classmates? >> we are a fairly religious family and we have talked about they have gone to heaven to be with jesus and that's about all we can say. talk about you are not going to see them anymore and they are not going to be around. you really struggle to find the words, you know, as to what happened. >> you should know that everyone is sending well wishes not just to you and your family but your community as a whole. so many people have asked me to pass that along. >> we're a strong community, a strong family community with a
in america were. the designer of washington's city, there was a competition and he submitted a design for a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat told congress it was neither a large nor awe-inspiring. he said the building served its purpose. if it was more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to be its permanent resident. >> a photo credit has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. you can watch sunday evening on 7:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> my inspiration was the idea that wanted to explain how it happened. istook taylor we know the main events from our point of view. what wanted to do was show from a different angle, from the ground up what it felt like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices int hat system. one of the things that has happened is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
things in america work. l'enfant, who designed washington's city, there was competition. he submitted the designs for a polis. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat said it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer the congressman dave said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> the key -- vicky goldberg has gathered a few of her paper white house totals. watch sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on american history tv. >> bankamerica ceo brian monahan said the government, lenders and borrowers have to reset their expectations on home ownership. he called for fannie mae, freddie mac and the federal health administration to return to the primary focus on helping low and moderate income homebuyers. he spoke at a brookings institution and bent on future of home ownership. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. i'm vice president and co- director of the economic study program at brookings, i'm pl
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)